An Edwardian luxury kitchen | Historic family house | The Solent

This luxury kitchen was part of a complete refurbishment of an iconic house on a private estate.  It has been in the same family for generations.  The client is restoring the house for posterity– taking every room apart and putting it back together.  All the issues that have arisen from the piecemeal development that has taken place over the years have been dealt with.

The client’s brief was to design a kitchen that looked like it had always been there yet worked for modern life.  Our solution was a luxury kitchen that was discrete in its design with subtle Edwardian influences.  It is understated, very well made and will sit there quietly, at the heart of the house, for generations to come.

Space Planning & Architectural Challenge

This area of the house used to be a collection of tiny rooms.  To create a feeling of order and symmetry and to organise how the space is used, we worked with the architects, the Radley House Partnership, to open up the area.  The walls were removed and the space was set out using steel beams hidden behind a low ceiling.

Once this was resolved, the kitchen was quite straight forward to lay out. We introduced the glazed screen to create a comfortably proportioned space for eating with a visual connection through to the kitchen.

The Everhot stove was chosen as an additional heat source for the kitchen.

 

Technical & Functional Considerations

When planning this kitchen, the aim was to improve how the space functioned whilst introducing an elegance appropriate for the main living space in a grand house.

Kitchens are practical spaces that have to work hard.  However, we deploy a range of techniques that hide the ugly, modern day essentials like fridges.  We position bulky appliances just where they are needed, but in such a way that they do not spoil the aesthetic of a luxury kitchen.

 

The sink is positioned to make the most of the fabulous views and light.
Timber panelling behind the stove is shielded by the Everhot lids.
The pantry supports the main cooking space, separated by a sliding door.
We created a niche to disguise the depth of the large fridge hiding within this bank of cabinets.

 

Notable Materials & Features

The Cook’s Table is oak with a smooth sycamore worktop and Carrara marble section.  The rest of the joinery is painted tulip wood.  We used the same colour on the walls, ceiling and cupboard doors to create a calm and neutral interior.  The worktops are made of Santa Fiora – its wet sand colouring and natural markings echo the proximity to the beach and provide a gentle contrast to the neutral scheme.

The English stone floor is from Purbeck quarry.  We felt it was important the floor was made of a natural material so it will age gracefully – quiet and understated.

 

A stainless steel work top with water safe edge was used in the pantry.
The beautiful open shelves, inspired by the scullery at Cragside, are deep and made of oak, making good use of limited space.

What We Achieved For Our Clients

Our clients wanted the kitchen to look as though its always been there.  Not flashy but understated and very well made.  Their mission was to create something that future generations would enjoy.

That’s what we do best.  We regard this as an archetypal Artichoke kitchen.  Practical with a subtle aristocratic beauty that doesn’t shout because it doesn’t have to.

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